©
flimslit:

possession (1981)

Deadpan (Steve McQueen, 1997)

Turner Prize-winning artist Steve McQueen—now best known for his feature films, Hunger, Shame, and 12 Years a Slave—put himself in the line of fire in Deadpan (1997), a restaging of Buster Keaton’s falling house gag from Steamboat Bill Jr. McQueen does more than remake the stunt; his presence as a black man transforms the work into a commentary on race relations and the precariousness of the black experience. 

"Damage Control: How Artists Destroy to Create Art"

snuff-tv:

Francis Bacon by John Deakin for Vogue, 1962.

Flowers thrown into a dumpster in Greenwood Cemetery, NY
sleaterkittey:


Rudolf Schwarzkogler - 3rd Action, 1965.

Once any independence is diffused, Hari is left, as Zizek observes, a symptom of man, a materialization of his guilt, his fall into sin, who can only deliver him (and herself) by her suicide. Solaris relies on science-fiction rules to present as a material fact the notion that woman merely materializes a male fantasy: the tragic position of Hari is that she becomes aware that she is deprived of all substantial identity, that she is Nothing in herself, since she only exists as the Other’s dream. The best outcome Hari can hope for is to become a martyr who is able to sacrifice herself for the sake of the man she loves.

perfectframes:

HOKUSAI MANGA / EDO PORN / 1981 / KANETO SHINDO